Stillness

Stillness

How do we connect to the formless dimension? By being still. “Be still and confess that I am God” (Psalm 46:11). What does it mean to be still? To be conscious without thought. When you are still, you are deeply yourself. Then you open yourself up for the Source to communicate with and act through you. In stillness, you become one with all.

“We need to find God, and He cannot be found in noise and restlessness. God is the friend of silence. See how nature – trees, flowers, grass – grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun, how they move in silence…We need silence to be able to touch souls,” said Mother Teresa.

When you are concerned about a situation or what you usually call a problem – physical, emotional, or otherwise – you may not want to be still. You want to resolve the situation and so you want an answer fast, you want it right now. You become desperate. You cannot afford to be still. Stillness will not yield any result. So you think. Very few situations require an immediate action. When an action is required, it is of course proper to act. But for most situations, withdrawal from the situation is necessary. There is the situation and here is your interpretation of the situation which is often different from the situation. In fact, the problem is usually not the situation but your interpretation of the situation. You need to take a step back, you need to withdraw. Stillness can help you do that.

What people often want is an answer that will give them their desired outcome. They want an answer that will relieve them of the discomfort they feel. They consider the outcome more important than the truth until they sense that the truth is more important than the outcome.

When you practice stillness, trust is developed. You develop trust in your true nature and a deep trust in God. Then you can say with St. Paul, “…All things work for good for those who love God…” (Romans 8:28). Do you have a terrible life situation? Be still. “The language of God is silence; words are poor translation,” said Deepak Chopra.

Imagine that a surgeon is operating a patient. In the middle of the operation, the patient comes awake on the operating table and starts shouting, “Oh my God! I am undergoing an operation. What should I do?” This is a time the patient should do nothing and allow the surgeon to operate.

We are so used to doing something that even when the time comes for us to do nothing, we still want to do something. It is as if we are scared of doing nothing, scared of being still. Sometimes we should simply be and not do. Sometimes what is required is for you to be still.

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